Spring 2018 Paris Faculty

Content Courses

Habibi_100.jpgMariam Habibi – (Un)Veiling the Republic: France in the Muslim World and The Muslim World in France

Mariam Habibi received her PhD from the Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Paris in 2000 with a dissertation on French Diplomacy in early twentieth century Persia, published by L'Harmattan in 2004. She also holds a DEA in History from Sciences Po, Paris and an MA
in History from the University of London. She is adjunct professor and thesis director at the American Graduate School of International Relations and Diplomacy and has taught at the UC Paris Center program, the American University of Paris, Columbia University at Reid Hall, and New York University in France. Her publications include L'Interface France-Iran 1907-1938, L'Harmattan, (2004),  History: a Course Companion, Oxford University Press (in co- authorship),,  Authoritarian States, Oxford University Press (in co-authorship) 2015.

Carolecropped.jpgCarole Viers-Andronico – Documenting the Periphery: Identity and Citizenship in the “Other” Part of Paris

Carole Viers-Andronico received her PhD in Comparative Literature from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2008 with a dissertation applying methodologies from translation studies and philosophies of aesthetics to texts produced by members of the Parisian literary group OULIPO. She is currently Academic Coordinator for the UC Paris Center programs in Global Cities Urban Realities, French Language and Culture, French and European Studies.  She has taught French language, Comparative Literature, and Cinema courses at the UC Paris Study Center.  Her most recent publication is the translation of Malkhas' novel Awakening, Sardarabad Bookstore (2015), for which she was the Editor.

Justin_Smith.jpgJustin E. H. Smith - Nation and Identity in Modern France: A Series of Great Ideas

Justin E. H. Smith is university professor at the Université Paris Diderot - Paris 7, in the department of History and Philosophy of Science. He is, most recently, the author of Nature, Human Nature, and Human Difference: Race in Early Modern Philosophy, and Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life, both from Princeton University Press.
He is a regular contributor to the New York Times, and is the Paris editor of Cabinet Magazine. He has a Ph.D. in philosophy from Columbia University (2000), and a B.A. in philosophy and Slavic studies from the University of California, Davis (1994).

Tolentino.jpgCynthia Tolentino - Food in a Global City

Cynthia Tolentino taught courses on culture for almost fifteen years at universities in the United States (Columbia University, New York University, University of Pennsylvania, and University of Oregon). She holds a Ph.D. in American Civilization from Brown University. Her publications include a book, America's Experts: Race and the Fictions of Sociology, and several articles in literary and postcolonial studies journals. In France full time since 2012, she teaches at Sciences Po and is conducting research on narratives of study abroad.

City and Language Courses

P1010342.JPGChristina von Koehler - Pursuing Paris

The recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship for Research in France (topic: The Paris Opera), Christina von Koehler holds an M.A. in Political Economy from Columbia University’s School of International Affairs and an M.Phil in Modern European History from the City University of New York. A former dancer and arts administrator, she has curated and written the catalogues for several exhibitions, including “La Fontaine: The Power of Fables” at the New York Public Library.  She has taught history and civilization courses at Baruch College and John Jay College in New York, at the UC Paris Center program, at New York University in Paris, and at the Paris campus of D.C.'s American University.  She also lectures on opera and ballet for Stanford University in Paris.

Claudiacropped.jpgClaudia Fontu - Unlocking French

Claudia Fontu received her M.A. in French Literature and her M.A. in American Literature from the University of Paris Sorbonne III in 2006. Her PhD at the University of Paris Sorbonne III is in progress. She has taught French language and civilisation classes at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, and has taught French language classes at the UC Paris Center program, at Franklin and Marshall College in Paris, at University of Florida in Paris, as well as French literature classes at the University of Southern California in Paris. Since 2010 she has also taught French language courses and is a teacher trainer at the Department of French Language Didactics at the Institute of Linguistics, Paris. A former journalist, she translated three books of Romanian poetry into French. She is also a painter.

clip_image002.jpgSabrina Petitjean - Unlocking French

Sabrina Petitjean received her M.A. in applied linguistics and phonetics from the University of Paris Sorbonne in 2004. She followed this degree with a year of specialization in didactics in languages ​​and cultures. Since 2004, she has taught French language and civilization, as well as phonetics, in many international academic programs. She has had the opportunity to teach students from many American universities such as UC, Yale, Harvard, and Georgetown. She is also a trainer in argumentative techniques and teaches writing to advanced students, studying at French universities. Since 2006, she teaches French for specific purposes (business, diplomacy, media and culture) to international business schools such as H.E.C. In 2008 she joined the teaching staff of the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Paris and is now a member of the jury's assessment of French language exams, such as TEF.

Ronnback.jpgFredrik Rönnbäck - Unlocking French

Fredrik Rönnbäck received his Ph.D. in French literature from New York University with a dissertation on the poetics of mourning in the works of Georges Bataille, Michel Leiris and Maurice Blanchot. He also holds an M.A. in literature from Uppsala Universitet. He teaches literature and the history of ideas at multiple campuses in Paris. His current research focuses on the importance of forgery in postwar French politics and aesthetics. He has translated several works by Georges Perec into Swedish and his co-translation, with Matthew Amos, of Pascal Quignard's The Hatred of Music was recently published by Yale University Press. In 2015 he contributed to the exhibition catalogue for Leiris & Co. at Centre Pompidou Metz. He frequently writes about literature for the Swedish newspaper Svenska Dagbladet.